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Trying To Crack The Recipe! Maid Rites
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Posted By:   bgaviator   (Line Poster - 230 posts)
Posted On:   Thursday, August 24, 2006 04:31 PM

I remember going to my grandmothers house in Greenville, OH on the weekends and we would always stop at a place called Maid-Rite....now I know there are supposedly different variation of this sandwhich around the country, but this version is the one I will always love best. I have a pretty good method for replicating the taste of these at home. Here is the general recipe although it has no precise measurements: 1 lb ground beef browned and drained Squirt in some yellow table mustard Shake on a generous amount of sugar Salt & Pepper And then fill the skillet with water and let water boil out so the flavors of the mustard and sugar soak into the meat. Assemble on a bun with with onions, pickles and cheese....oh   More>>

I remember going to my grandmothers house in Greenville, OH on the weekends and we would always stop at a place called Maid-Rite....now I know there are supposedly different variation of this sandwhich around the country, but this version is the one I will always love best. I have a pretty good method for replicating the taste of these at home. Here is the general recipe although it has no precise measurements:

1 lb ground beef browned and drained
Squirt in some yellow table mustard
Shake on a generous amount of sugar
Salt & Pepper
And then fill the skillet with water and let water boil out so the flavors of the mustard and sugar soak into the meat.
Assemble on a bun with with onions, pickles and cheese....oh, and the mustard HAS to be Emeril's New York Deli style mustard to get the authentic taste.

But here is my question: Watching the workers at Maid-Rite, they don't boil the meat....instead the meat is cooked in what appears to be steam tables. They then shake on a secret mixture of dry spices. Now, the flavor of my Maid-Rites is dead on, but just not the texture since I boil my meat and they seem to steam theirs. So since the salt, pepper, and sugar are dry ingredients...how the heck do they get the flavor of yellow table mustard into dry form? I assume you can't use something like Colmans dry mustard, because that would make it taste like crap! And also, how do they steam this meat without the meat falling down into the holes of the steam table....I think this would make a mess. Any thoughts would be great.

Also, a side note: I don't know what Emeril's Deli Style mustard is composed of, but it's needed on the buns to make an authentic tasting maid-rite. Heinz used to make a mustard called Heinz Mild Mustard....that is what I always used before, but then I couldn't find it anymore in the stores....heck, it's even hard enough to find Emeril products in the stores here in Cleveland! The people around here are wierd!

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Re: trying to crack the recipe! Maid Rites

Posted By:   deltadoc   (Line Poster - 166 posts)
Posted On:   Thursday, August 24, 2006 05:05 PM

Having grown up in Iowa, where Maid Rites were invented in Muscatine in 1926 (some people claim that it was in Marshalltown, but I don't believe it!), Maid Rites have been a staple of my diet whenever possible.

The very very best Maid Rite in the world is on the north side of Waterloo Iowa on HW 63, called Katies or something like that.

I've seen dozens of recipes for Maid Rites. The chain uses a patented steam table to cook the meat. Originally, (don't know about nowadays) they bought jars of liquid, occasionally referred to as the "vinegar" from the Maid Rite supplier.

The internet is full of Maid Rite knockoffs. Every recipe claims it tastes like the original. I've tried pretty much everyone of them, and many do not taste at all like a genuine Maid Rite!!!!

The closest knockoff I've found uses chicken broth, and reduces it with the ground beef at the same time.

I came up once with one that my wife and I swore tasted exactly like a genuine one, that consisted of using pretty much equal amounts of soy sauce and Worcestershire sauce.

Only once was I able to get it right, and didn't write down the amounts.

The one I used from the internet with chicken broth was the closest yet.

I've also seen a recipe or two using mustard or dry mustard. I didn't think those tasted right.

I've also seen many that used Coca-Cola. I have mixed feelings about the resultant "Maid Rite" made with Coke. Maybe they would have been better when Coca-Cola was still made the old fashioned way with extracts of cocaine leaves and cola nuts. But it is merely my speculation!

The texture of the meat, in my opinion, will never be the same as when it is steamed versus being boiled. The boiling tends to make the meat texture kind of a dry, grainy kind of texture.

And the last known Maid Rite in the Twin Cities went out of business about a year or so ago. When they originally opened, it was a guy from Iowa whose life-long dream was to own one.

They just never seem to have caught on in Minnesota.

When I first moved here in 1969, there was a little bitty tiny Maid Rite in North Minneapolis that had about 4 booths and three stools at the counter. Her Maid Rite steamer was the smallest one I ever saw to this day. Must of held about 5-10 lbs of meat maximum, and she didn't make them very good.

Muscatine is where it's at. And I'm not gonna pay over $5 a piece to have the Maid Rite in Marshall town Fed Ex some to me!

BTW: The original Maid Rite did not have cheese. That came later on and was called a "CheeseRite". Also, originally, a Maid Rite with "everything" did NOT include any ketchup. For awhile there in the 1960's, the owner of the chain tried to impose a "no ketchup" rule in all the franchisees establishments, but the public demand for the ketchup vetoed his quest!

Maid Rite chain was sold a few years ago, and was once again sold to someone else just a couple years ago again.

It's hard to make a good Maid Rite without the great Iowa beef that they were invented with!

doc

Re: trying to crack the recipe! Maid Rites

Posted By:   bgaviator   (Line Poster - 230 posts)
Posted On:   Thursday, August 24, 2006 05:59 PM

It would be interesting to know the truth behind Maid-Rites considering the place in Greenville, OH is over 70 years old. Some people claim that this place is the original and that others have knocked IT off. Now I've read some posts about Maid Rites using cola syrup which you can buy supposedly from Walgreens. My grandmother used to say to cook the meat down with Coke....however, I know Maid rite in Greenville steams the meat, and I have never seen them use any liquid seasoning at all....I just see them shaking in a blend of spices...which I'm assuming has sugar, salt, pepper....but I don't know what can replicate that mustard taste in dry form.....the method I currently use replicates the taste of the Maid Rites I'm used to, just not the texture so much.....and also, steaming the meat makes for a drier, more crumbly consistency whereas boiling makes a more moist, sloppy joe like consistency.

Re: trying to crack the recipe! Maid Rites

Posted By:   deltadoc   (Line Poster - 166 posts)
Posted On:   Thursday, August 24, 2006 06:46 PM

Well, I can guarantee that Maid Rites were invented in Iowa, as they used to publish the history of Maid Rites on the menu, and the menu was generic to all the franchisees.

However, there was a place in Davenport Iowa that used to sell Maid Rites, (and BTW all true Maid Rites use the patented steam table to cook the meat), and he got tired of having to pay so much for the jars of liquid that were used to flavor the meat in the steam table. I think the place was like called Henderson's or something. Anyway, we brought a friend down there from Minnesota who'd never had one before and when we went to this "Henderson's", they were now serving "Henderson burgers". When questioned, he told us the story about how he just gave up the franchise because of the ridiculous costs involved and figured out how to make the sauce himself based on the ingredients label on the jars they used to make him buy.

I know from talking to the owners of Katies in Waterloo, that they use a liquid bought straight from the Maid Rite corporate distributor and they loosely refer to the liquid as the "vinegar".

It would not surprise me if, due to transportation costs of today, that Maid Rite might try to reduce the ingredients into a powdered form to remove the costly weight of the liquid.

It also wouldn't surprise me if some place would try to make their own spice blend instead of paying through the nose for the spices/liquid from Maid Rite headquarters. Although I would also have to think that they'd definitely be violating their franchisee agreement.

Henderson got away with it, because he didn't use the term "Maid Rite" anymore, although the resultant "Henderson Burger" was indistinguishable from the "real thing"!

Anyway, he was dealing with the original Maid Rite family owner who became the boss through inheritance. The Maid Rite name has since been sold twice that I know of.

A lot of history of Maid Rites (except for the Muscatine Iowa birthplace) is on the website for the Marshalltown Iowa Maid Rite. Use Google "Marshalltown Maid-Rite".

That Marshalltown Maid Rite was actually featured on a PBS special as part of a special about outstanding sandwiches available all over the country. (Maybe that's why they sell them over the internet for over twice what they cost in the restaurant!)

doc

Re: trying to crack the recipe! Maid Rites

Posted By:   RodinBangkok   (Toqued - 1038 posts)
Posted On:   Friday, August 25, 2006 01:36 AM

I'll second the use of chicken stock (not the canned salty crap), I also use just a small amount of chicken soup base. I make mine in a large non stick fry pan over low heat, cover and let it steam that way. Just found an interesting site about their equipment you may be interested in:

http://www.fermag.com/sr/v10i8_sr_maidriteequip.htm

Rod
Rod
______________________
Be Bold and Mighty Forces Will Come To Your Aid.....Goethe

Re: trying to crack the recipe! Maid Rites

Posted By:   KITDOG   (Line Poster - 210 posts)
Posted On:   Friday, August 25, 2006 05:05 AM

Being from Iowa, I`m with Delta Doc. Chicken broth and slow simmering are the ticket. I don`t understand your objection to using dry mustard. It works great for me! My "Maidrites" are very close to original. I like mine better!
Kit
It`s Hard To Follow Your Dreams When You`re Living A Nightmare!

Re: Trying To Crack The Recipe! Maid Rites

Posted By:   spoonbread   (Toqued - 4793 posts)
Posted On:   Friday, August 25, 2006 05:40 AM

OK...excuse the ingorant chef here...what is a Maid-Rite?
"If you don't talk to your cat about catnip,
who will?"

Re: Trying To Crack The Recipe! Maid Rites

Posted By:   RLT   (Sous Poster - 631 posts)
Posted On:   Friday, August 25, 2006 09:07 AM

Never heard of them either, but sounds like a variation of the spices used to make corned beef, except without the corned beef.
A dish is more then the sum of its ingredients.

Re: Trying To Crack The Recipe! Maid Rites

Posted By:   RodinBangkok   (Toqued - 1038 posts)
Posted On:   Friday, August 25, 2006 11:31 AM

It's a loose meat sandwich...sort of like a sloppy joe, but with no sauce, just minced beef with some spices, thats slow simmered, then drained, on a soft white bun.

Here's their site, theirs a video there also if you really interested.

http://www.maid-rite.com/

They were always a big hit with my kids...and I have to admit I love em too.

Rod
Rod
______________________
Be Bold and Mighty Forces Will Come To Your Aid.....Goethe

Re: Trying To Crack The Recipe! Maid Rites

Posted By:   Half Baked   (Toqued - 1574 posts)
Posted On:   Friday, August 25, 2006 12:31 PM

I've never heard of this sandwich either but it sounds like the restaurant that Rosanne Barr opened up on her show and in 'real' life. The 'loose meat' rang a bell.
Jan

Please spay and neuter your pets.

Re: Trying To Crack The Recipe! Maid Rites

Posted By:   bgaviator   (Line Poster - 230 posts)
Posted On:   Friday, August 25, 2006 12:46 PM

They are very good. The meat is sweet and I can usually put down about 4 in one sitting. Also, 1 lb of beef can make you about 7-8 sandwiches so they are very economical to make too! I don't know anything about these "iowa" maid-rites....I'm used to the Greenville, OH maid-rites....but if they're similar then I must say this....do not use regular table mustard on the buns! It should be a mustard like Emeril's New York Deli Style Mustard, or Heinz Mild (if you can find it anymore).
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